WESTERN BHUTAN

  • PARO

    WESTERN BHUTAN

    Paro valley extends from the confluence of the Paro Chhu and the Wang Chhu rivers at Chuzom up to Mt. Jomolhari at the Tibetan border to the North. This picturesque region is one of the widest valleys in the kingdom and is covered in fertile rice fields and has a beautiful, crystalline river meandering down the valley.

    Accentuating the natural beauty are the elegant, traditional-style houses that dot the valley and surrounding hills with over 155 temples and monasteries in the area, some dating as far back as the 14th century.

     

    The country’s first and only international airport is also located in the region. Its close proximity to the historical and religious sites in the region has resulted in the development of an array of luxurious, high-end tourist resorts making Paro one of the main destination for visitors.

    The region contains one of Bhutan’s most iconic landmark, Taktsang Monastery, the Tiger’s Nest. This awe-inspiring temple was constructed upon a sheer cliff face, above forests of oak and rhododendrons.

     

    The national museum, Ta Dzong, is also set in Paro. An ancient watchtower that displays hundreds of ancient Bhutanese artefacts and artwork including traditional costumes, armour, weaponry and handcrafted implements for daily life. The collection at the National Museum preserves a snap-shot of the rich cultural traditions of the country.

     

    Another site worth visiting in Paro is Drugyel Dzong or The Fortress of the Victorious Bhutanese. It was constructed by Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyal in 1646 to commemorate his victory over marauding Tibetan armies. The fortress was destroyed by fire in 1951 but the ruins remain an impressive and imposing sight.

    Taktsang (Tiger's Nest Temple)

    Tamchog Lhakhang

    Drugyel Dzong

    The National Museum of Bhutan

    Dumtse Lhakhang

    Kyichu Lhakhang

    Chele La Pass

    Places Of Interest

    Browwa School

  • THIMPHU

    WESTERN BHUTAN

    Thimphu is the most modern city in Bhutan with an abundance of restaurants, internet cafes, nightclubs and shopping centres. However, it still retains its’ cultural identity and values amidst the signs of modernization. Thimphu is one of the few towns in Bhutan that have been equipped with ATM banking facilities and is a good place to stock up on some currency.

    There are several attractions in Thimphu such as the National Post Office, the Clock Tower Square, the Motithang Takin Preserve, Tango and Chari Monasteries, Buddha Dordenma, National Memorial Chorten, Centenary Farmer's Market, Semtokha Dzong to name a few. These form the most important tourist attractions in the capital city.

    The culture of Bhutan is fully reflected in Thimphu in respect of religion, customs, national dress code, the monastic practices of the monasteries, music, dance, literature and the media. Tshechu is an important festival where mask dances, popularly known as Chams, are performed in the courtyards of the Tashichho Dzong in Thimphu. It is a four-day festival held every year during autumn (September/October), on dates corresponding to the Bhutanese calendar.

     

    One of the most curious features of Thimphu is that it is the only capital city in the world that does not use traffic lights. Instead, a few major intersections have policemen standing in elaborately decorated booths (small pavilions), directing traffic with exaggerated hand motions. 

    Dochula Pass

    Tashichho Dzong

    National Memorial Chorten

    Buddha Dordenma Statue

    Druk Wangyal Chortens

    Centenary Farmers Market

    Places Of Interest

  • PUNAKHA

    WESTERN BHUTAN

    Punakha Dzongkhag has been inextricably linked with momentous occasions in Bhutanese history. It served as the capital of the country from 1637 to 1907 and the first national assembly was hosted here in 1953.

     

    Punakha Dzong is not only the second oldest and second largest dzong but it also has one of the most majestic structures in the country.

     

    October 13, 2011 marked an unforgettable wedding of the King of Bhutan, Jigme Khesar Namgyel Wangchuck to Jetsun Pema which was held at Punakha Dzong. Punakha Dzong was built at the confluence of two major rivers in Bhutan, the Pho Chhu and Mo Chhu, which converge in this valley. It is an especially beautiful sight on sunny days with sunlight reflecting off the water onto its white-washed walls.

    In addition to its structural beauty, Punakha Dzong is notable for containing the preserved remains of Zhabdrung Ngawang Namgyal, the unifier of Bhutan as well as a sacred relic known as the Ranjung Karsapani. This relic is a self-created image of Avalokiteswara that miraculously emerged from the vertebrae of Tsangpa Gyarey, the founder of the Drukpa School when he was cremated.

    Punakha Dzong

    Chimmi Lhkhang

    Punakha Suspension Bridge

    Sangchhen Dorji Lhuendrup Nunnery

    Khamsum Yulley Namgyal Chorten

    Ritsha Village

    Places Of Interest

    Wolathang Primary

  • WANGDUE PHODRANG

    WESTERN BHUTAN

    Wangdue Phodrang is one of the largest dzongkhags in the country. As the district covers 4,308 sq. km and ranges from 800-5800m in altitude, it has extremely varied climatic conditions ranging from subtropical forests in the south to cool and snowy regions in the north.

    One of the most notable sites in the district is Phobjikha Valley. This valley is the habitat of the rare and endangered Black Necked Cranes that roost there during their annual migrations. The residents of the valley have garnered much acclaim for their conservation efforts to preserve the habitat of these beautiful birds.

     

    Every year the Black Necked Crane Festival is held in Phobjikha in order to protect and spread awareness of the cranes. The festival includes songs, masked dances and plays by the local school children. This event is one of the most unique and popular festivals in the country.

     

    With its diverse climates and rich natural resources, Wangdue Phodrang Dzongkhag is home to many rare and exotic animals like Red Pandas, Tigers and Leopards. There are also large numbers of rare birds such as the Black Necked Crane, White-Bellied Heron and the Spotted Eagle.

    Gantey Monastery

    Dargay Goempa

    Phobjikha Valley

    Places Of Interest

  • HAA

    WESTERN BHUTAN

    This tiny region is one of the most beautiful and isolated areas in the kingdom, adorned with pristine alpine forests and tranquil mountain peaks.

     

    Haa is the ancestral home of the Queen Grandmother and the illustrious Dorji family. This valley remains one of the least visited areas in the country and retains the air of an unspoiled, primeval forest. The wooded hills of Haa provides an ideal location for hiking and mountain biking. Biking around the valley to visit the dozen or so local temples is an enjoyable way to spend the day when visiting.

     

    Haa is home to a number of nomadic herders and hosts an annual Summer Festival that showcases their unique lifestyle and culture. The festival is an ideal occasion to immerse yourself into the traditions and unchanged lifestyles of nomadic Bhutanese herders, as well as to sample some delectable Haapi cuisine. 

    Haa's major feature is the Haa Valley, a steep north-south valley with a narrow floor. The name Haa, connotes esoteric hiddenness. An alternative name for the district is "Hidden-Land Rice Valley."The main crops grown in the valley are rice, wheat and barley. Other cash crops such as potatoes, apples and chilli's  are also grown by farmers on the valley floor, along terraced hillsides and in some of the more accessible side valleys.

    Black Temple (Lhakhang Narpo)

    White Temple (Lhakhang Karpo)

    Haa Gonpa

    Places Of Interest

  • GASA

    WESTERN BHUTAN

    Gasa, the northernmost district of the country adjoins the districts of Punakha, Thimphu and Wangdue Phodrang and with Tibet to its north. This starkly beautiful region with elevations ranging from 1500 to 4,500m experiences extremely long and cold winters and short but beautiful summers.

     

    It has the smallest population with just about 3000 inhabitants. This region is inhabited by the Layaps; nomadic herders with a unique culture. Their main source of revenue comes from trading products made from their yaks, such as yak hair textiles, cheese, butter and yak meat. They also harvest and sell Cordyceps, (a fungus of extremely high value that is frequently used in oriental medicine). The majority of the known herds of wild Takin also occur in Gasa.

    Gasa has become a tourist destination because of its pristine forests and the exceptionally scenic location of its Dzong.  A narrow road from Punakha, which is mostly unpaved, reaches up to the Dzong and is now being extended up to Laya. Gasa Dzong was built by Zhabdrung in 1646 to commemorate the victories over the Tibetans and it later defended the country against several invasions in the 17th and 18th century.

     

    Gasa is famously known for its inhabitants, the Layaps, and for the Snowman Trek - one of the most challenging treks in the Himalayas. The newly established festival called the Royal Highlander Festival is becoming more popular each year. Attending this festival allows you to see the real feature of this remote Dzongkhag and should not be missed by travellers.

     

    Gasa is also famous for its healing hot springs, located around 2hrs walk at the bottom of the ridge. The hot spring is popular amongst Bhutanese all over the country during the winter. 

    Laya Village

    Gasa Dzong

    Lunana Village

    Gasa Tshachu

    Places Of Interest

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